Dumbbell training has stood the test of time for good reason. Along with the versatility in weight choices for multiple athletes, a good set of bells can be used to duplicate nearly all types of barbell exercises, while also offering a wider range of single-arm, rehab-specific, and explosive movements in virtually any sized space—something not possible with bars or most weight room machines.
Once you go over that $1,500 price point, you should really start seeing more powerful drive systems and more impressive entertainment packages like large touchscreen displays and internet connectivity. Don't be tricked into paying more for flashy features that mean nothing. At this price point, we have picked the best models that offer adjustable options and performance features that make these treadmills incredibly versatile. Read More…
Most elliptical trainers work the user's upper and lower body (although some models do not have moving upper body components). Though elliptical trainers are considered to be minimal-impact, they are an example of a weight-bearing form of exercise.[2] They can be self-powered by user-generated motion or need to be plugged in for adjustment of motion and/or for supplying their electronic consoles and resistance systems.
We've all heard (and probably made) these excuses when it comes to working out: "I don't have time," or "it's raining outside," or "I don't really feel like making the trip to the gym." Well, there's an easy and effective way to take all these excuses out of the equation: Bring the gym to you. Equip your home with a treadmill and you'll enjoy more active living while saving money on those pricey gym memberships.
Treadmills as power sources originated in antiquity.[5] These ancient machines came in three major designs.[6] The first was to have a horizontal bar jutting out of a vertical shaft. It rotated around a vertical axis, driven by an ox or other animal walking in a circle pushing the bar. Even humans were used to power them. The second design was a vertical wheel, a treadwheel, that was powered through climbing in place instead of walking in circles. This is similar to what we know today as the hamster wheel. The third design also required climbing but used a sloped, moving platform instead.
The first consumer treadmill for home use was developed by William Staub, a mechanical engineer.[4] Staub developed his treadmill after reading the 1968 book, Aerobics, by Dr. Kenneth H. Cooper.[4] Cooper's book noted that individuals who ran for eight minutes four-to-five times a week would be in better physical condition.[4] Staub noticed that there were no affordable household treadmills at the time and decided to develop a treadmill for his own use during the late 1960s.[4] He called his first treadmill the PaceMaster 600.[4] Once finished, Staub sent his prototype treadmill to Cooper, who found the machine's first customers, which included sellers of fitness equipment.[4]
It’s a fact; runners need top shock absorption to protect the joints from the harsh impact of running. Each brand has their own shock absorption technology and features to help add to the comfort of the running deck, but of course some are better than others. The best treadmills we have chosen in this category are built for both comfort and performance, featuring advanced shock absorption technology and impressive speed and incline controls to simulate varying terrain, ideal for runners who are also training for a race or marathon. Read More…
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